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Home » Update 31st January 2019

Update 31st January 2019

Ringing in the New Year for Beriah

A new year is upon us and whilst the mob at Calan is generally in good health, Beriah, a 30+ year-old horse at Calan, is having some problems focusing on certain occasions. Some folk have made the comment that he seems to be having some eye sight problems – that is true and on some days it is more noticeable. But on other days he seems okay. Alan, ever vigilant, has been wanting to make preparations if the old fella goes blind.

As Beriah spent 8 years in an agistment place with no fly veils, Alan believes the flies have damaged his eyes, and that is why he has been gently bathing Beriah’s eyes with tea leaves. If old Beriah’s eye sight continues to worsen we hope to be in a situation to help him continue a life with some quality. It is everyone’s wish and hope this does not come about so Alan has cleverly researched how to properly care for blind horses.

Blind horses it turns out, can live meaningful lives as long as you understand what to do to support them. Knowing that older, unwell and disabled horses typically get bullied and pushed away from the herd, the solution we’ve heard is to pair them with a companion horse who is gentle and who can wear a bell to guide them. The research shows that the horses’ personality before blindness is usually how they will be after blindness once they adjust to what feels like a new environment, to having a friend (their own service animal so to speak!) , to relying on the bell and given time.

With paddock mate Omar having had a rough go in life himself, (we’re seeing evidence that he was mistreated, acting like he is worried that maybe he is doing something wrong and waiting to get hit or something) and with old Beriah being neglected without hoof or dental care for years and harassed by other horses at the agistment place prior to Calan, the two mates are wanting to enjoy their golden years in the company of each other and knowing a meal will be there for them morning, noon and night.

As you can see in the photo Omar’s stable has been divided so he and Beriah can stand side by side and Beriah will be able to eat in peace because he will hear the little bell and not feel panicked. (Beriah on the left and Omar on the right) We hope that all horses and animals have humans willing to explore life-sustaining options when they get sick, old or disabled.

Thanks to our supporters, Omar now has 6 collars just in case he loses one so that old Beriah can live the good life we promised him when he arrived. Your donations are what enable us to do this good work. We never know what lies beyond the corner and with so many elder horses in our care, and with Alan as the go-to 7 day a week, 24 hours a day caregiver, every donation ensures each and every resident gets specifically what they need.

For the horses,
Alan Gent, Mae Lee Sun and all of us at Calan Horse Sanctuary

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